Transitional Housing

 

Brenda's-Story
Brenda’s Story

Brenda came to EGH when she became homeless for the first time at age 52 after fleeing from an abusive husband.

After going through our screening process, Brenda was accepted into our transitional housing program where women live in a shared home for up to two years while receiving the services they need to transition out of homelessness.

At Elizabeth Gregory Home, Brenda found a household with residents sharing the responsibilities and support of a community experience. Prospective residents are interviewed and selected by a careful intake process to ensure they are committed to setting goals, developing self-esteem, and breaking the cycle of homelessness.

Elizabeth Gregory Home provided Brenda, and many other women, with a safe place to live and the support and guidance they need to get back on their feet. We offer supportive services for six months to two years to prepare women to live independently and reduce their risk of returning to the streets.

Professionally trained staff from Elizabeth Gregory Home coordinate the program and manage the facility. We provide comprehensive case-management that includes working with the women on their self-identified life goals.

With the support of EGH, Brenda was able to return to school, become recertified as a nursing assistant and find stable employment.

Elizabeth Gregory Home

Elizabeth Gregory Home

Day Center

IMG_0235Being homeless means women lack many of the simple things we take for granted every day – clean clothes, a place to eat, or just somewhere to sit down and rest.

To meet these needs the EGH drop-in Day Center is open five days a week, Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. At EGH we try to provide as many of these basic needs as we can.

The drop-in Day Center provides clients with a range of vital services. Clients have the opportunity to meet with EGH Care Managers for referrals, support and advocacy to obtain educational and vocational training, job skills, employment, medical care, mental health counseling, drug and alcohol support, and referrals to long-term housing. Homeless women who access the drop-in center can work with our care managers to secure housing and, based on eligibility, have access to our transitional housing program upon openings.

In addition, the Day Center offers:

  • Accessible showers.
  • Computer and Internet Access so women can learn job skills, research educational and job opportunities, and stay in touch with family and friends.
  • EGH accepts Mail and Phone Messages for our drop in clients so they have a phone number and address to give out to potential employers, landlords and other agencies.
  • A communal Dining Area and Kitchen stocked with food that has been donated offers communal dining or the women can cook their own meals.
  • Restrooms and Laundry Facilities.
  • Volunteer led Classes that help build social skills, job skills and encourage healthy physical activity.
  • Weekly Health Advocate to assist women in accessing health care resources.

For Clients

 

Sam and RoseElizabeth Gregory Home provides a warm, welcoming day center and a transitional housing program for homeless women in our community.

Transitional Housing

Elizabeth Gregory Home provides a seven bedroom home for single homeless women, where they can live in a safe environment. Elizabeth Gregory Home provides a safe place for women leaving shelters to find the support and guidance they need to get back on their feet.

The Transitional Housing Program is located in the Maple leaf neighborhood in North Seattle. We offer supportive services for six months to two years to prepare participants to live independently and reduce the risk of returning to the streets. Professionally trained staff from Elizabeth Gregory Home coordinate the program and manage the facility. We provide comprehensive care management, which includes working with residents on their self-identified life goals.

Elizabeth Gregory Home functions as a household, with residents sharing the responsibilities and support of a community experience. Prospective residents are interviewed and selected by a careful intake process that ensures
that our guests are committed to setting goals, developing self-esteem, and breaking the cycle of homelessness. Elizabeth Gregory Home endeavors to be an important part of the community and a good neighbor to those around us.

EGH Day Center

Elizabeth Gregory Home provides a drop in center for women that is open Monday – Friday from 9am – 5pm and offers a wide range of services, including:

  • Computer lab with internet access.
  • Free laundry facilities.
  • Individual care management services.
  • Kitchen with food for cooking and a dining area.
  • Mail and phone message.
  • Restrooms.
  • Showers.
  • Weekly health advocate.

Women have the opportunity to meet with EGH Care Managers for referrals, support and advocacy to obtain educational and vocational training, job skills, employment, medical care, mental health counseling, drug and alcohol support, and referrals to long-term housing. Women who are homeless who access the drop-in center have the opportunity to work with our Care Managers to secure housing and, based on eligibility, have access to our transitional housing program upon openings.

For questions about the program, please contact us at (206) 729-0262 or visit us in the Day Center, Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Once again, thank you for your interest in Elizabeth Gregory Home. Map to Center.

Evie’s Story

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Josie’s Story

My story began in the Philippines. I was married, had three beautiful children, and was a successful businesswoman. After 26 years, my marriage collapsed. I had to take my husband to court to try and get my fair share of our assets, but the court ruled in his favor. I was left with nothing. Thankfully, Read More . . . “Josie’s Story”

Christie Lands a New Job!

I became homeless because of family problems. In my younger life, my dad was very abusive and I was going through a lot of trauma. By the time I was 15, I was homeless and sleeping on a friend’s couch while I struggled to finish high school. As I look back, I now realize I’ve Read More . . . “Christie Lands a New Job!”

Michele’s Story

In 2010, Michele Martin found herself homeless. While residing in transitional housing at Aloha Inn, Michele re-engaged in the workforce as an AARP volunteer at Elizabeth Gregory Home. Since then she was able to reunite with her husband and flourish as the “hub” of the EGH Day Center. Michele Martin was hired as the Day Center Read More . . . “Michele’s Story”

Jodie’s Story – Veteran’s Day

Jodie is a 69 year old veteran who has lived in her car and in shelters for the past two years. She served in the Army for 12 years as a dental therapist. “I really enjoyed the Service,” Jodie said. “It was a great experience. I got to travel and lived in Germany for a Read More . . . “Jodie’s Story – Veteran’s Day”

Sandra’s Story

“It was my time to heal, regroup and come up with a game plan for my future.” By Sandra Four years ago, I found myself in a position I thought I would never be in. I was on the streets of Seattle with no place to go. The stigma, the shame and the fear of Read More . . . “Sandra’s Story”

Sarah’s Story

Sarah moved from Fresno to Seattle in 2011 in order to meet her father for the first time. She then secured a job at a salmon cannery in Alaska, and after a couple of months of hard work, returned to Seattle to stay with her father. She lived with him for several years before moving Read More . . . “Sarah’s Story”

Annie’s Story

In 2016, I was working at a nursing home that specialized in caring for elderly people with dementia. Then I had to give up my job to take care of my father, who had diabetes.  I had no money after he passed, which led to my homelessness. Not knowing where to stay, I was directed Read More . . . “Annie’s Story”

Vera’s Hardest Job

It was January of 2017 when I tripped and fell in front of my apartment. I didn’t remember anything until I woke up from surgery in a hospital bed. They told me if I had bled for two minutes longer, I would not have survived. I needed to relearn how to walk and talk, so Read More . . . “Vera’s Hardest Job”

Angie’s Story

My first defining moment occurred the day I was born in Wiesbaden, West Germany, in 1956. I was separated from my mother and placed in a foundling home until I was four years old, then moved to an orphanage in Frankfurt. When I was six, James and Hildegard Dysart adopted me. Soon after, we moved to Read More . . . “Angie’s Story”

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